Gold repair

The History and Appeal of Kintsugi
Kintsugi is a uniquely Japanese method of repairing cracked or chipped ceramics by gluing them together with lacquer and decorating them with gold powder. Because lacquer is both a paint and an adhesive, repairing vessels using lacquer has been practiced since the Jomon period, and it is said that the modern-day kintsugi technique evolved during the Muromachi period. The appeal of Kintsugi is that it uses gold and silver powder to decorate damaged areas. Accidental damage and its shape were deliberately decorated to make them stand out, and people enjoyed them calling it a "scenery." Kintsugi, which finds beauty in imperfection, was born from the unique Japanese sense of aesthetics and has been passed down to the present day. The artistic and historical appeal of Kintsugi has earned it high praise from many people, and it is also becoming increasingly popular overseas.
Kintsugi: a craft that can be enjoyed by all generations
Recently, there are more opportunities to experience Kintsugi yourself, such as through classes and Kintsugi kits. Rather than throwing away dishes that have been cherished by your family or that are filled with memories just because they are cracked or chipped, repair them and continue to use them. The appeal of Kintsugi is that you can repair a one-of-a-kind dish with your own hands, use the dish engraved with your feelings, and pass on your feelings.
Kintsugi: a craft that can be enjoyed by all generations
Recently, there are more opportunities to experience Kintsugi yourself, such as through classes and Kintsugi kits. Rather than throwing away dishes that have been cherished by your family or that are filled with memories just because they are cracked or chipped, repair them and continue to use them. The appeal of Kintsugi is that you can repair a one-of-a-kind dish with your own hands, use the dish engraved with your feelings, and pass on your feelings.

Restoration process by our partner Kintsugi craftsmen

"Sabi lacquer" is a process used to fill in cracks after gluing and shallow dents such as chips, and is made by mixing abrasive powder with lacquer.
"Naka-nuri" is the process of smoothing the surface by applying multiple coats of Roiro lacquer. The process of drying, polishing, and applying Roiro lacquer is repeated until the surface is smooth.
"Jinuri" is the process of applying a thin layer of lacquer to act as an adhesive to fix the powder. If you are finishing with gold powder, applying red iron lacquer will enhance the gold color.
"Powder sprinkling" is the process of sprinkling gold and silver powder on top of the lacquer and then using cotton wool to fix it to the surface of the lacquer.
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